Black History Month 2017

 

October is Black History month and 2017 marks the 30 anniversary of the month in the UK. Every Generation Media in partnership with Sugar Media Marketing Limited are relaunching 100 Great Black Britons 2017. The campaign provides an opportunity for students to reflect on what makes a Great Black Briton.  Nominations are being sought for unsung heroes and community champions which is a great chance to involve your students in the process.

As well as thinking about significant figures in this country, the month also gives students the opportunities to look at significant figures throughout history:

George Bridgewater – art, liberty and slavery:  In this website and resource pack from LGfL  it enables students to take a close look at George Bridgetower and his relationship with Beethoven. Students can also examine other artists, writers and musicians who were working at the same time as Bridgetower, with a special focus on their relationship to the anti-slavery movement. This resource can be used with KS3 and KS2 pupils.

The life of Nelson Mandela –  from CultureStreet.org this resource and lesson plans focus on the life of Nelson Mandela using  the work  of South African comic book company Umlando Wezithombe.  This resource can be used by KS1 and KS2 students.

Walter Tull – Was a professional football and he was the first British-born black army officer and the first black officer to lead white British troops into battle. The video below tells his story and is perfect for KS2 and KS3 pupils looking at WW1 and the impact that Walter had.

 

As well as researching significant figures, this month provides pupils the chance to reflect on tolerance and inclusivity in society, Developing British Values from LGfL – looks at this topic and provides short video clips for discussion in class. True Tube provides videos that cover RE, PHSE and citizenship and have a collection of videos that can be used as discussion points for Black History month.

Other ideas could be involve the children in cooking, asking family members for recipes Cookit have recipes and information on foods that can be used in class. Students could create play lists from prominent artists to share in class or at assemblies, Audio network could be used to look at Jazz and Blues music.

What will you be doing for Black History month? Please share your work with us via our Twitter and Facebook page.

 

Augmented Reality updates

Apple have just released iOS 11 to the public, with so many exciting new features, one of the features you may have missed is the inclusion of ARkit a software development kit to enable the creation of new Augmented Reality Apps.

Bridging the gap between the virtual and physical worlds, Augmented reality (AR) is a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are “augmented” by computer-generated or extracted real-world sensory input, AR changes the way we see, imagine, and learn about the world around us.

AR in education allows students to interact with objects and concepts that they could never do without the aid of technology. Though it might be a buzz term in education circles, don’t assume that AR is just another fad. After all, profound learning occurs when students create, share, interact and explain by working with the environment around them.

LGfL have been at the forefront of using AR and have partnered with the AR experts at Computeam to create augmented reality apps for the Cold War (KeyStage 3/4), First

World War (Key Stage 2/3) and Maya and Prehistory (both Key Stage 2), and newly released this week Vikings (Key stage 2) Find out more at ar.lgfl.net

Here is what Phil Birchinall from Computeam  thinks about AR and the latest iOS11 update:

“We know that pupils react well to augmented and virtual reality stimuli. It creates a moment that they will remember. So, if that moment is structured within robust learning resources, that cognitive trigger and memory becomes associated with the subject or learning. We’ve learned a lot during our partnership with LGfL and have seen how pupils absorb and relate to this technology and how it can accelerate and deepen learning.

iOS 11 is a significant step forward. With ARkit we can now move away from trigger images (where appropriate). For example, in the LGfL WW1 resource, it’s possible to virtually drive a Mark 1 tank from 1916, but only triggered from an image (make sure you update your app!). With ARkit, that tank could be on any flat surface and could also be made to appear life size”

If you are still wondering ‘Why Augmented Reality?’ you may want to read this LGfL feature article on AR in teaching & learning.

 

How has AR in your classroom helped support learning?

European Day of Languages 2017

Next Tuesday the 26th of September is European Day of Languages. It aims to promote the rich linguistic diversity of Europe and raise awareness of the importance of lifelong language learning for everyone. It was set up by the Council of Europe and was first celebrated in 2001.

The European Day of Languages website has a range of resources for teachers including lessons plans and short activities to help you on the day.

LGfL have a range of resources to help with your language teaching within school these include the following: Rigolo (primary French) and Vamos Unit 1 and 2 (primary Spanish).

Newbury Park primary school in Redbridge have an excellent resource entitled Language of the month – which includes resource packs to be used in the classroom, activity packs and interactive video clips showing children teaching their home languages.

What are you doing to celebrate? We would love to hear from you and share your celebrations via our Twitter or Facebook pages.

Primary assessment changes

The DfE have published the new teacher assessment frameworks for both Key stage 1 and Key stage 2.  Alongside this they also responded to the primary assessment consultations with a number of key reforms:

One of these is to:

  • introduce an online multiplication tables check, to be taken by pupils at the end of year 4, from the 2019 to 2020 academic year onwards.

There have been no details released yet as to what the new tests will look like with the first of these being the online multiplication tables check that will come in, this has now been confirmed for the end of Year 4.  Schools within LGfL have access to the excellent J2E Blast  which has online times table practice as well as practice tests for both KS1 and KS2 arithmetic papers. Another tool to help with this via LGfL is Busy Things  which have a range of tools including time table practice games among other tools all linked to the National curriculum

Other reforms will:

  • improve the way that writing is assessed, so that teachers have more scope to use their professional judgment when assessing pupil performance
  • introduce a new assessment at the start of reception from September 2020 to act as the start point for measuring progress, so we can give schools credit for the progress they help pupils make in reception, year one and year two
  • remove the statutory status of end-of-key stage 1 assessments at the earliest possible point, from the 2022 to 2023 academic year, once the reception baseline is fully established
  • reduce burdens for teachers by removing the requirement to carry out statutory teacher assessments in English reading and mathematics at the end of key stage 2 from the 2018 to 2019 academic year onwards
  • improve the early years foundation stage profile, including revising the Early Learning Goals to make them clearer and align them more closely with teaching in key stage 1

Further guidance and exemplification materials from the STA will be published later in the autumn term to assist teachers with assessment.

Michael Tidd has produced an excellent blog post highlighting his thoughts on the changes and Third Space Learning have produced a blog post for SLT detailing the 9 important changes that relate to maths.

What are your thoughts on the changes?

Reading Zone Live and National Poetry day 2017

National Poetry day is on the 28th September 2017, the theme this year is Freedom.

To get you ready for this, LGfL are hosting a special Poetry themed Reading zone Live with Roger Stevens on the 27th September at 2:30 pm. Roger Stevens is best known for founding and running the award-winning Poetry Zone website.  His most recent poetry collections include It’s Not My Fault (with Steven Withrow) and an anthology called Is This a Poem. Reading zone live is an excellent way for you and your class to engage with an author and hear how he creates poems and ideas as well as asking questions either before the day or during the event.

We would love you to join in with this event and there are a number of ways you can do this:

  • If you have access to Video conferencing (VC) facilities you can link with the live event by e mailing contentsupport@lgfl.net
  • If you do not have access to VC, you can e mail questions in advance to contentsupport@lgfl.net
  • You can watch the event live from 2:25 pm on the 27th September here
  • Tweet us before and during the event using the hashtag  #RZL to @LGfL.

 

 

 

There are a number of resources that can be used to help you plan and deliver lessons on or before National Poetry day based around the theme of Freedom:

  • Read or perform a poem – there are a selection of poems on the National Poetry day website that can get your class inspired.
  • Posters to put up in class or around school and on your website to highlight the fact that you are supporting National Poetry day.
  • Lesson plans for KS 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 from the National Poetry day website to get you started, including a toolkit full of ideas and inspirations.
  • Use Perform a Poem from LGfL to get tips on performing poems including resources for teachers.
  • Use J2launch via LGfl – why not blog about your favourite poem on Freedom, use J2e5 to write your own poem relating to freedom and use j2vote to vote for your favourite class or school poem.

We would love to see the work you do around Reading Zone Live and National Poetry day via our Twitter and Facebook pages.