Remembrance Day.


Armistice day or Remembrance Day is on the 11th November, it marks the day that World War 1 ended at 11 am on the 11th day, of the 11th month in 1918. Ceremonies are held at the Cenotaph in London as well as at War memorials and churches across the U.K. and overseas. A 2 minute silence is held to remember the people who have died in all wars – WW1, WW2, Falklands, Gulf war as well as the conflicts in Argentina and the Iraq.

King George V held the first 2 minute silence on 11 November 1919 and made the request for the silence to be observed so:

“thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead”.

There are many ways of remembering with pupils, for younger pupils Busy Things have a template poppy to paint, for older students they could make their own poppies – from hand prints and then use these to write poetry on.  In Flanders Fields and Ode to Remembrance are two poems that could be shared with older students, they could use copies of these to create their own ‘black out poetry’ this is when a page of text, is coloured over so that only a few words are visible, these words then create a new poem, great to get the children thinking about the choice of their words. Pupils could use J2E to research and write about the impact of the wars on their local community after perhaps visiting their local war memorial.

The British Legion – has an excellent schools page with links for activities in class as well as assembly resources for KS1-5 pupils.

Widgit – have a range of Activities and books on Remembrance Day as well as WW1 and WW2 to support learners in class.

First World War – The Active Worksheet was produced in response to the centenary ofthe outbreak of World War 1. The resource pack uses augmented reality to produce a genuine ‘wow’ moment in the classroom and bring virtual artefacts to the desktop. This is backed up by mapped curriculum activities focussing on history, literacy, music and art. The pack has been designed to make the commemoration accessible to key stage 1 and 2

World War 1 – This collection from BBC schools has a range of videos, activities and assemblies for both primary and secondary schools.

Poppies – is a beautiful animation from Cbeebies following a young rabbit through the poppy fields, great to use with younger children.

Trench experience – this innovative virtual-reality app from LGfL brings life in the trenches to life, and is ideal for History and English teachers covering World War 1 and trench life and warfare in general.

The M roomThe M Room resource from LGfL gives exclusive access to secret World War II listening sites where the British Secret Service bugged high-ranking German Military prisoners. The resource features an interview with one of the original secret listeners and extensive primary-source material from the Ministry of Defence, relatives of those involved, and The National Archives.

Women in computingWomen in Computing from LGfL aims to recognise and promote the achievements of women in British computing within the social context of the time. The work of women as code breakers during WW2 is one of the areas that is covered within this resource.

Activehistory – There are a collection of Remembrance Day materials here for Years 7- 13, including an assembly, put together by Russell Tarr.

Remember you can share any work with us on either our Twitter or Facebook pages.




Listening Books Update

The long standing partnership between London Grid for Learning and Listening Books ensures that LGfL teachers are able to have access to over 100 curriculum based audiobook by simply logging on with their LGfL username and password.

If you are not aware of Listening Books, it is a charity providing a service for people with print impairments. Reading is essential for any child’s success. All too often, the barriers faced by children with difficulty reading outweigh their desire to read and, without proper guidance, they never may never overcome them. Listening Books offers audiobooks which can be used with children and young people who struggle to read books in the usual way due to an illness, disability, learning or mental health difficulty.

Listening Books are proud to announce 2 new releases to the LGfL Listening Book catalogue of audio books. “Why is Snot Green? And Other Extremely Important Questions” and “Inventors and their Bright Ideas”

Children with special educational needs such as dyslexia often find ‘decoding’ words can be a barrier that gets in the way of their understanding and enjoyment of a text. They can end up feeling left behind, dejected and lacking in confidence. Audiobooks remove these barriers by replacing the written word with a spoken voice, enabling pupils to visualise a story and glean meaning from the words. Reading along with the audio can help with word recognition and reading speed while being able to keep up with peers can have a visible impact on self-esteem.

Listening Books support the National Curriculum from Key Stage 2 to A-Level and have a huge range of fiction and non-fiction titles for both adults and children. Listening to audiobooks allows children and young people to listen to the same books their friends and peers are reading, improve comprehension and word recognition as well as helping to instil a greater understanding and enjoyment of literature. For older members, audiobooks, as well as being an enjoyable activity, can for some provide welcome relief from pain, boredom and loneliness, lifting them out of what are often challenging circumstances.

There is a great range of fiction and non-fiction available to support pupils from Key Stage 2 up to A-Level, including:

  • British History Makers: King Henry VIII by Leon Ashworth
  • GCSE English: Of Mice and Men: The Text Guide by Coordination Group Publications
  • Secrets of the Rainforest: Predators and Prey by Michael Chinery
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl
  • An Inconvenient Truth: The Crisis of Global Warming (Young Adult Version) by Al Gore
  • Dates with History: 6th August 1945 The Bombing of Hiroshima by John Malam
  • My Friend Walter by Michael Morpurgo
  • The Elements in Poetry: Poems about Fire edited by Andrew Fusek Peters
  • The Colour Purple by Alice Walker
  • Face by Benjamin Zephaniah

All you need is to enter your LGfL username and password and this will bring you straight through to the Listening Books library. All of the titles here are available to stream 24 hours a day.
Any questions please get in touch.

Case studies

We have a range of case studies on LGfL, the main purpose of these is to highlight how resources have been used in particular settings.  Giving you an insight into how you can replicate this within your own one and giving you further ideas of how to use the resource.

Our latest case study looks at our World War 1 Trench Virtual Reality experience.

Each study starts with the challenge – what schools were looking for help with:

“in this case it was for pupils to appreciate the wider implications for technology, society and international relations for soldiers in World War 1. To use VR technology to accelerate their understanding of the topic several times over, allowing teachers to get pupils discussing these higher level issues more quickly with a corresponding positive impact on their exam answers.”


The case study then details what the school did with the resource, in this case they used the VR element of the resource to immerse the students within the trench experience. The study moves on to explain how they used the resource:

“even though we have limited resources to use in lesson time, with careful management of the classactivities we found that students could get their turn to experience the VR resource.

Next the impact on learning was looked at:

“The achievement of the students has been significantly boosted as result of using this resource.Their engagement levels were remarkable. Many of them were familiar with VR technology, but in leisure context.”


To conclude the case study then looks at examples of achievement:

“it makes it much simpler to ensure no one is left behind in their understanding of basic concepts.”


You can view the video from the case study below and read the full case study here

We have a range of case studies on the website including: Cold War, CyberPass and BalletBoyz. Do you have a case study to share? We would love to hear from you, you can download the  Case study template.
Any questions please get in touch.


After two weeks of coding inspiration it is important to remind ourselves that introducing young people to coding gives them an appreciation of what can be built with technology.

Our students are surrounded by devices controlled by computers in their everyday lives. To understand coding, is to understand how our devices work, and being able to imagine new devices and services is essential to inspire and push our students to solve the problems of the future.

Doron Swade (MBE) Formerly Curator of Computing, and Assistant Director & Head of Collections, Science Museum, Tells us:

London Grid for Learning supports this view which is why we made the resource “History of computing”, the resource promotes the idea that by understanding our digital heritage we can better understand our digital future.

This resource features unique materials to help understand how British computing developments have influenced the world we all live in. It also provides a wide range of materials to show how British innovation in Computing Continues to impact on our world today and shape our tomorrow.

The resource features:

Unique video and photographic resources from the National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park.

– Offering an expert insight into the iconic British Computing systems from the past 70 years.

  • Curriculum material created by practising Computing teachers all mapped out the National Curriculum.
  • The video material is used to support a broad range of complete lesson activities to cover Key Stage 2 to 5, however teachers are encouraged to use and modify the suggested activities and tailor them to the needs of the students and curriculum.

Here are two quick examples of how I modified the lesson plans within the unit “A Brave new world”

First let’s look at the lesson about building a computer, My students  used an animation app called Chatterpix Kids (but you could use Morfo or our very own j2e5) to create simple animations of parts of a computer in which the animation tells you what the part does in relation to the whole computer.

My second example is with the Code breaking lesson, I used the lesson plan and video to explain the historical significance of code breaking and then used ‘the explaining binary resources’ from the wonderful website CSunplugged for children to explore how computers use a special type of code to communicate with each other.

Finally, another why to support the ‘History of computing” content is use the many resources found within Barefoot Computing Project These resources will help you improve subject knowledge and understanding within computing. Giving clear definitions, examples and progression across all primary school age and ability ranges.

I hope you have enjoyed the focus on computing within the curriculum blog these last two weeks, please do let me know what you would like to see more of in the comments section.

Tell us what you are have done for EU Code Week in your school and remember you can share your work either on our Twitter or Facebook pages









5 ways to….

At London Grid for Learning we are always looking at new ways to promote our learning content, this is why we are Introducing our new 5 ways to series.  

The aim of 5 ways is to showcase five ways to use LGfL resources across the curriculum. These highlight five resources from LGfL that you can take and use and share for example, they can be shared in the staff room, at INSET sessions and also given to parents so that they can support student learning at home.

We are launching our 5 ways series with 5 Ways to support Maths and 5 ways to Support Parents, both can be downloaded by clicking on the link.

Both resources show you 5 resources that you can use straight away in your classroom and to promote learning at home, we would love to know what you think about them and how you have used them in your setting.

We will also be running 5 ways as short training sessions, so if you are a subject leader or are running a leaders forum, why not get in contact with our us to talk about having 5 ways as part of your CPD programme.

Over the next couple of months we will be adding to the series, but would love to hear your thoughts! What 5 ways would help you get the most out of LGfL  resources?

Please let us know via our Twitter or Facebook pages or in the comments section of this blog using the hashtag #5ways

Code week.EU

There is still time to join with EU Code Week before it closes on Friday, you can use a range of LGfL resources to help support your coding activities, today we are going to focus on resources within Python Tutor and Web Tech tutor.

Combined both resources offer 50 coding projects presented in single simple stand-alone lessons. Students understanding is initially developed at a conceptual level by allowing them to drag and drop parts of the code, but later they can refine their skills with specific code creation in activities.

Students watch a short introductory video. Which presents a key coding concept or problem. They then can carry out a series of related short tasks using the software, after each task is complete, the software will then present the next task in the unit.

When using these resources, it is important to understand that simply using this resource in isolation will not give your students the depth and breadth of computational skills needed to become independent Computational thinkers.

Using and moving code within these resources does create a solid scaffold for students to explore unfamiliar concepts and gives them quick on-screen results but it’s important for students to have freedom to create code outside of this scaffold, the idea of the resource is not to “copy code” but to gain practical knowledge of key concepts.

Computing Inspector and advisor for Hampshire Inspection and Advisory Service Phil Bagge talks about using coding schemes of work:

 “I often start with examining the module and asking what computational thinking and problem-solving attitudes it is building I then explore ways that they might adapt that planning, chopping the instructions up, asking the students to predict what parts will do before they use them”

All videos within the tutorials are downloadable and can be used outside of the resource, one way of using this would be to allow all students to complete the standalone lesson, but then let the students have freedom to impairment the key concepts but for a different purpose, creating their own projects.

Coding was introduced to help drive creativity within students, using these resources can help build up student’s confidence so that they can translate it into innovative and creative outcomes. We look forward to seeing your students doing this for EU Code Week and please remember you can share your work either on our Twitter or Facebook pages


“Everybody in the world should learn to program a computer, because it teaches you how to think”— Steve Jobs

Coding is for all, not just for programmers. It’s a matter of creativity, of computational thinking skills, of self-empowerment, Nothing boosts your problem-solving skills like learning how to program a computer, learning to code boosts your attention to detail, having a high level of focus can improve any part of your life, Decomposition is another key skill learned when coding. In decomposition, you break a big problem down (like a complex program) into several smaller problems or actions, Decomposition is another incredible life skill.

Our National Curriculum computing programmes of study tells us“A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world” Coding isn’t just the entering code into a device, it’s about teaching students how to identify and understand problems or needs in the real world and using creativity alongside logic reasoning to improve the world around them. It’s about teaching them what is behind their screens and boxes and how the modern world works. With this knowledge, they can begin to see the possibilities so that they can create innovations that could one day change the world.

EU Code Week is a grass-root movement run by volunteers who promote coding in their countries as Code Week Ambassadors. Anyone – schools, teachers, libraries, code clubs, businesses, public authorities – can organise a #CodeEU event and add it to the map.

Europe Code Week is now launching the “CodeWeek4all challenge” to contribute to increase the penetration of coding in schools. Schools are invited to register online for free to get a unique code to be added to the description of all Code Week events organised in the school preferably between October 7th and October 22nd 2017, you can see here a list of all UK events.

The challenge consists in getting involved as many students/pupils as possible during Europe Code Week 2017. The unique code associated with the school will allow Code Week organisers to sum up all the participants to the events organised in the same school and to compare the sum with the total number of students declared in the application form. Schools achieving a participation rate greater or equal than 50% will be awarded a personalised “Certificate of Excellence in Coding Literacy” and will be announced in the Europe Code Week website.

Apply now, share the unique code with all the teachers in your school, and ask them to provide a coding experience in their classrooms during code week. remember to fill in the application form here

We will be being looking at how LGfL content can help support EU Code week each day on the blog so please do Come back.

Tell us what you are doing for EU Code Week in your school and share your work either on our Twitter or Facebook pages

Sigurd and the Dragon VR

LGfL have once again teamed up with Computeam and Roger Lang FRSA, a long standing expert on this period of history to bring you an immersive mixed reality resource based on the tale of Sigurd and the Dragon.  Using Roger’s beautiful 3D photogrammetric scans of the cross we have brought this incredible object to life in amazing detail, allowing pupils to access its history and beauty, offering an innovative educational experience, that puts the pupils at the centre of history.

Sigurd and the Dragon takes the pupils back 1,000 years to the early Viking age in Britain. Using highly immersive virtual reality, they will embark on an impossible and unforgettable field trip to an authentic Viking Longhouse to hear the classic Norse tale of how Sigurd killed the greedy dragon Fafnir.The story is carved on a Christian cross in a churchyard in Halton Lancashire and pupils will also visit the cross viewing it as it remains today.

The virtual reality story telling is also backed up by 5 ActiveWorksheets that display Augmented Reality artefacts exploring themes in viking history from ‘Raiders and Traders’ to ‘Pagans’. The ActiveWorksheets can be given out to each pupil in your class or to a group of pupils, they are flexible and allow for both individual and group work exercises. This also gives flexibility in the number of devices you have available in your classroom.

The worksheets can deliver video, audio and 3D models & animations, you can tap into each individual’s preferred learning style using a single resource. This also helps EAL and/or SEN pupils who may struggle reading or listening to a resource.

Sigurd and the Dragon VR is a fantastic starting point for a whole range of activities. The ability to take pupils back in time and place is a very powerful experience. They emerge from it engaged and ready to learn. The final activity in the resource covers Green Screen and animation as the pupils tell their tales from Norse Mythology. Within this pack are backgrounds for Green Screen, original music by Roger Lang FRSA, Arthur Racham’s 1911 illustrations and sound effects.

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon VR app iOS here or for Android here

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon AR app for iOS here or for Android here

This resource can be used alongside Vikings at the British Museum, this striking resource began life as an educational film screened in cinemas around the UK. It not only includes original footage from the film, but also new, exclusive LGfL footage of curators handling Viking artefacts in the British Museum, plus high-resolution images of real-life Viking artefacts and a comprehensive glossary of Viking terms and words.

The resource is split into 8 modules; Archaeology, The Viking Ship, Raiders and Conquerors, TheVikings in Britain, Social Life, Looking Good, Trade and Industry, and Magic and Religion, allowing students to easily access specific topics and information.

Using the Gallery,from NEN children can also find high quality images that they are able to use in their own presentations about life in Viking times.

Tell us how you use VR in your class and share your work either on our Twitter or Facebook pages

Cold War VR Update

Einstein wisely stated, ‘The only source of knowledge is experience’.

As a teacher, we are always thinking on how can we deliver new experiences to students within the limitations of our school space and time, with many teachers finding it harder to go on school trips because of expense and time wasted travelling, we need to look at how technology can provide a range of immersive and engaging experiences that couldn’t normally happen within a normal school day.

The ClassVR by Avantis Whitepaper tells us that:

Virtual Reality, by its pure definition, can deliver experiences and interactions for students that are either not practical or not possible in the ‘real world’, provides an unparalleled way to immerse and captivate students of all ages. Virtual Reality helps students feel immersed in an experience, gripping their imagination and stimulating thought in ways not possible with traditional books, pictures or videos, and facilitates a far higher level of knowledge retention. “

With this in mind LGfL and the amazing team at Computeam have looked at updating our Cold war resource, so that it offers an experience that cannot be found anywhere else, that of a Virtual Reality Nuclear blast!

I spoke to Phil Birchinall Education Director at Computeam Ltd about this exciting update:

“Our challenge was to create a scenario that presented pupils with a realistic experience of the genuine level of fear that existed in the country during the late 70’s and in to the 80’s. Most people then considered it to be a matter of when not if, nuclear Armageddon and ‘mutually assured destruction’ would take place. We wanted to portray how life could change dramatically and instantly in the case of a nuclear strike. At the same time we don’t want to leave students traumatised! Our goal is to provide just enough jeopardy and threat to leave them feeling they have just experienced something significant.

 Also, this is a teaching resource so it has to be loaded with prompts and questions for further study and exploration. We made sure that the context is accurate. The sounds are all genuine sounds from the period, even the date it’s set, 18th July 1981. The bunker is an accurate recreation of a DIY bunker layout produced in the 1960”

 Finally, implementing VR into your curriculum fully can be hard and making sure it has an impact on learning as well as having the wow factor is vital. LGfL with help from ClassVR by Avantis have produced a prompt sheet which can help you on your class journey.



You can find the new Cold War Nuclear Strike app iOS here or for Android here

Tell us how you use VR in your class by sharing either on our Twitter or Facebook pages.

Dyslexia Awareness Week

This year, Dyslexia Awareness Week runs from Monday 2nd October to Sunday 8th October 2017, with World Dyslexia Awareness Day taking place on Thursday 5th October 2017. This year’s theme is Positive about Dyslexia. Because of this, I would like to draw your attention to all the resources to support learners and staff with dyslexia on LGfL, but also to share my own personal experience of dyslexia as a teacher and as a learner:

“I remember feeling relieved to be diagnosed with dyslexia when I was 19 years old and at art university. It had taken a long time to come to grips with it and finally be tested.

 My school years were the worst time for me. School report after school report said the same thing over and over; I was “A slow starter” and apparently showed a “Lack of effort.” Primary school was a battle every day for me as I attempted to remember things and to catch up with people around me. Simple things like remembering the order of the alphabet and months of the year escaped me. Having to write the long date on a piece of work could take a whole lesson. With little support or understanding, my school life was a blur of disappointment. Thankfully for me, I was lucky enough to have an amazing Art teacher who could see that I had a talent for art. This teacher was able to see that I could organise objects on the page and show a focus that many staff didn’t think I was capable of.

 Fast forward to my twenties and I decided to become a teacher, not for the love of my past school years, but instead because of how much I disliked it! My decision was based on my own personal experience that information needed to be presented using a range of media and techniques, and staff needed to offer support for all types of learners.

Over the last 15 years, I have used technology to support myself, and the many pupils around me, to succeed in learning, no matter what needs they had.

 If I wasn’t dyslexic, I wouldn’t have been able to be such a creative person nor would I have become a teacher”

I am just one of the staff members at LGfL who has both a personal and professional in dyslexia. As a team we are fully committed to supporting all pupils, not just with literacy difficulties.

All relevant content development and procurement in the SEND and inclusion area is guided by this mission statement.

We offer many resources which support accessibility for all,  but one resource which is ideal for students with dyslexia is  WordQ SpeakQ. This is an easy to use and powerful literacy tool that helps young people who can type but may have trouble with writing, grammar and spelling. It includes Word Prediction, Speech Recognition and Spoken Feedback and it can be installed on staff, pupil or school computers and can be used online or offline. Staff, learners and parents at Tubbenden school in Bromley have been using this tool for almost a year and report a noticeable different in the confidence and achievement of some of their learners with dyslexia. Go to to find out more or to book on FREE training on using LGfL tools to support reluctant writers on 14th November.

To find out other ways LGfL can support, go to our dedicated SEND page or contact our wonderful SEND specialist Jo Dilworth who can be contact here:

In addition:

  • the online resources and all updates for this year’s DAW are available to download here.


  • you can download a Dyslexia Awareness Week school pack here it’s fill of inspiration stories, poster, videos and useful guides on how to talk about dyslexia


  • there are competitions that students with dyslexia can enter, by creating art, prose or videos that shows their journey with dyslexia.


  • Why not organise a Sponsored Spell? This is a fun way to engage primary school children in spelling and raising awareness of dyslexia. Make it a fun event for your students to encourage them to explore a range of spelling strategies, whilst also raising awareness and funds for the British Dyslexia Association.


  • BDA alongside Nessy are offering a free eBook “Dyslexia explained” The book covers: Understanding Dyslexia, Types of Dyslexia, What People with Dyslexia are good at, Dyslexia difficulties, Helpful Strategies and What works best for dyslexia all without the need for too many words. LGfL users can also get 15% off NESSY products. Go to Recommended Links in the SEND section for details.


Tell us what you are doing for Dyslexia Awareness Week on either our Twitter or Facebook pages, and if you like this post please do share it.

World Mental Health Day – 10th October 2017

10th October is World Mental Health day, the charity YoungMinds is calling on schools across the country to take part in #HelloYellow to show young people they’re not along with their mental health. Schools that register for #HelloYellow will receive a free pack, including a mental health assembly plan as well as a range of activities.

Mind Moose have produced an assembly that schools can use. It introduces mental health in the context of being as important to look after as physical health before discussing ways that we can all look after our mental health. It also discusses how children and adults in a school community can help each other to look after mental health.

The PHSE association has a comprehensive DfE funded Guidance on preparing to teach about mental health and emotional well being – as wells being a core guidance document it also includes a range of lesson plans for KS2 and KS3 pupils.  It has also produced a mental health teaching checklist as well as ground rules for teaching about mental health and emotional well being to ensure the safety of pupils when discussing this subject.

The Anna Freud National centre for families and children have produced an excellent booklet for supporting mental health and well being in schools – you can download it here: supporting-mental-health-and-wellbeing-in-schools. They have also produced an excellent animated video below to encourage talking about mental health in schools, great for use in assembly and in class:

Adolescent resilience – LGfL have teamed up with Public Health England to provide links to some school-ready resources from a range ofdifferent organisations. These include information on academic research, materials for whole-school approaches as well as lesson series and one-off resources, plus targeted support for specific problems, and signposting. Links do not imply endorsement of one approach over another.Please note that not all resources have been formally evaluated, although many have beendeveloped with schools and experts in the field. This resources are suitable for KS3, KS4 and KS5. 

Public Health England have a range of resources to support children in schools, they have a lesson plan and activities based around online stress and FOMO(Fear of missing out).

You can also download a range of calming music for use with either meditation, assemblies or in class from Audio network.

When I worry about things is another excellent resource from BBC Teach it is a collection of animated films that use personal testimony to explore mental health issues from the perspective of children. Alongside each, there is more information about the content of the film, and suggestions of how it could be used in the classroom. These resources are suitable for use with pupils aged 8-13.

Tell us what you are doing for mental health day on either our Twitter or Facebook pages.



World Space week 4th – 10th October 2017

World Space week runs from the 4th – 10th October, World Space Week is an international celebration of all things SPACE and focuses on science and technology and its role in the past, present and future of mankind, a way of not only promoting the work that countries do together to explore space but also how important space technology is to life on earth.

World space week is set between these dates as the 4th October marks the anniversary of the launch of the world’s first satellite Sputnik 1 in 1957 which began the Space Race. The 10th October is the anniversary of the signing of the Outer Space Treaty in 1967.

The theme for this year is Exploring new Worlds – this could be the start of some great discussions around where astronauts should visit next, what other worlds there are and what they could look like.  Children could use J2e to produce information books on their new worlds, or have a vote on if there are other worlds out there they could also use the paint feature in Busy Things to create these, both available via LGfL. Busy Things also have a range of labelling and fact sheet templates all around the Solar System and Space

If you are running an event in school, you can register this on the World Space week website as well as finding a whole range of resources including: A Space nutrition activity sheet and an activity leaflet from Tim Peake.

Or why not get pupils to build their own space craft to explore the new worlds and they can even train like an astronaut in P.E.

You can find lesson plans and activities from Switched on Science – Out of this world Unit for Year 5 via LGfL.

Remember we would love to see your work for World Space week – you can share via our Twitter and Facebook page.







The Big Draw Festival 2017

October is upon us which means it is time again for The Big Draw Festival, the festival is for anyone who loves to draw, as well as those who think they can’t! It’s an opportunity to join a global community in celebration of the universal language of drawing. This year’s theme is Living Lines: An Animated Big Draw Festival and will take place from 1-31 October 2017.

Every year, thousands of drawing activities connect people of all ages – artists, scientists, designers, illustrators, inventors with schools, galleries, museums, libraries, heritage sites, village halls, refugee organisations and outdoor spaces.

Since 2000, the annual, international celebration of drawing, which brings people together under the banner ‘drawing is a universal language’, regularly takes place in over 25 countries, involves over 1000 events and has encouraged over 4 million people back to the drawing board.

Open to a wide range of interpretations, this year’s Big Draw Festival is designed to get your marks moving! Whether you decide to get animated, theatrical, illusionary, technical or messy here are some ideas on how LGfL can support you and your school in making your lines come to life!

Culture Street Offers a range of Interactive resources to inspire young people to get started and share their creativity, you can find quick, simple and inspiring whys to make flip book animations  make a Flipbook online. Experiment with stop frame animation explore the history of early animation using a Kinora Viewer or take your students on a virtual workshop using the handy simple to follow videos to create your own ‘paper cut out animation’

A great way to introduce animation to Early Years is found in the J2E infant toolkit Your students can create simple animations using simple frame by frame illustrations that join together to make animations.

Linking drawing with illustrations is another way to inspire students, you can find multiple interviews with illustrators such as Tony Ross, Chris Riddell and David Roberts in reading zone live.

If you are looking at images to help inspire teaching and learning The Gallery is a growing collection, at present containing over 60,000 Image, Audio and Video resources covering a wide range of topics relevant to the curriculum. All of the resources are copyright cleared sothey can be downloaded, edited and re-purposed for educational use, both within the classroom and at home and offer arrange of imange to can start your drawing journey

If you need to brush up on your art skills or terminology then you can, Art Skills for Teachers offers simple explanations of a range of art techniques in action. The resource is full of unusual and easily accessible techniques to make art a truly inclusive activity for all members of your school community.

What will you be doing for the Big Draw? Please share your work with us via our Twitter and Facebook page.