It’s that time of the year ! Using Christmas media with LGfL content

It’s that time of the year when like or not we are all exposed to Christmas media campaigns, be it advertising for a movie or supermarket. Over the last week I’ve been exposed to two campaigns which on the face of it have little or no link, but when looked at more closely, all share an important message. So, how is an advert for a movie, supermarket and LGfL content linked? Read on.

Just before I hopped on a train at Paddington station this week I couldn’t help but notice the many Paddington Bear promotional material around the station. What drew my eye the most was the latest issue of The Big Issue with a striking cover with Paddington Bear being showcased as a ‘Migrant British Icon”

Inside the Magazine Kiri Tunks vice president of the National Union of Teachers and who teaches a Global Perspectives class at her school in Tower Hamlets, tells why she had used Paddington Bear in her teaching of British Values.

Is Paddington a migrant? A refugee? What is the difference between the two? Does it matter?

These questions were being debated in the classroom, with Paddington acting as a symbol of immigration in order to introduce children to issues surrounding refugees and immigration.

“It’s one of the popular lessons, kids really like it,” she says. “I was looking for a way of getting into the refugee question, and tackling the issue from a slightly abstract angle rather than using real-life stories, it is quite useful in representing the other view that sometimes refugees are seen as.”

“It makes the point that when you talk about people in an abstract sense, it’s easy to see them as a threat and different but once you know their story you start to relate to them.” You can download the lesson plan here, and for more Refugee resources created by the NUT go here.

At LGfL we have created a range of resources that can help support the idea of knowing the person behind the label,  Developing British Values offers unique, high quality, safe and relevant teaching resources that foster deeper understanding of keys issues that are raised with the concepts of immigration, tolerance and inclusivity. Celebrating Us looks at issues relating to cultural diversity and identity, rights, roles and responsibilities, online safety and good citizenship. Real Voices is a series of three short interviews with Syrian refugees living in Jordan; they talk about their experience having to leave home, their journey to safety and life in a refugee camp.

And if your youngest students want to go on more bear related adventures PB Bear offers stories that offer starting points for cross curricular work allowing children to make connections in their learning and to put them in to a relevant context.

And finally, Tesco’s Christmas campaign “Everyone’s Welcome”

In the clip, different families are seen celebrating the festival as they dig into a turkey. Commenting on the campaign, Alessandra Bellini, Tesco’s Chief Customer Officer, said: ‘This year, our campaign will celebrate the many ways we come together at Christmas It’s important to remember that no matter how different we are, we have more in common then we think”

To explore this idea in more depth why not use Espresso Faiths to look at different communities and ask your students to explore the common links that they can see in religious celebrations? If you wanted to look at this in the wider context you could use Growing up around the World, which aims to help Children in the UK understand the realities of children in different contexts, the resources show that many struggles and challenges are the same from South Africa to India.

If we can take one message from the many campaigns and resources is the theme of Diversity and Tolerance, and the idea of coming together as a whole, because we truly do have more in common then we think. Or as Dr Seuss wrote“Maybe Christmas, the Grinch thought, doesn’t come from a store”

Are you using Christmas media with LGfL content in your school to inspire your students? If so let us know by posting them on LGfL’s twitter or Facebook

 

 

 

 

Road Safety Week 20th-26th November 2017

Road Safety Week is the UK’s biggest road safety event, involving thousands of schools, organisations and community groups every year. Set up in 1997, the event is coordinated annually by Brake each November, and aims to encourage grassroots action on road safety and raise awareness about the part we can all play in preventing tragedies and making roads safer. The theme for this years Road Safety Week which runs from the 20th – 26th November is Speed Down Save Lives.

We can all play our part in raising awareness about the dangers of driving too fast and this year’s campaign will focus on:

  • speed causes deaths and serious injuries on our roads
  • rural roads are not race tracks
  • 20mph is the only safe speed in heavily built-up areas used by pedestrians and cyclists
  • going slow = stopping in time
  • speed is scary and noisy. It stops communities being enjoyable places for children and families to walk, talk and play
  • speed cameras work. They save lives.
  • Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) is an important development that is likely to be fitted to all vehicles in the future

There are new online resources for educators for 207, free to all those who register using this online form. The free online action pack includes more advice, ideas and resources, including lesson plans, assembly presentations, activity sheets and fact sheets linked to the 2017 theme of Speed Down Save Lives.

Brake, the road safety charity have produced a guide for educators on teaching road safety, as well as specific guidance for road safety with pupils with SEND.   They have  also recorded the webcast below, full of ideas and activities for educators to use during the week:

Thinking skills for Life from LGfL in partnership with Axis education, includes a section on travel and transport,there are 3 categories of worksheets for each activity which require different levels of literacy,thinking and comprehension skills. This includes worksheets which use Widgit symbols to support understanding for many young people with SEND, EAL and lower literacy levels.

Busy things has a template to help children create a poster on how to stay safe on the roads, children could also use JIT or J25 to create either an animation or a poster to encourage parents to speed down, save lives. They could also write to their local council and ask what is being done in their areas to encourage people to speed down and save lives.  Using J2data children could create data on traffic in their local area around schools and use this to encourage more people to walk to school.

RoSPA have also got a range of resources on their website for educators to use including teacher guides, workbooks and travel training for KS3 and KS4. Think from the Department of Transport have websites for Primary and Secondary both feature sections for teachers, pupils and parents.

STARS is TfL’s accreditation scheme for London schools and nurseries. STARS inspires young Londoners to travel to school sustainably, actively, responsibly and safely by championing walking, scooting and cycling. STARS supports pupils’ wellbeing, helps to reduce congestion at the school gates and improve road safety and air quality. STARS is open to all London schools and nurseries. To take part in the scheme, you first need to create a STARS Online account. This will put you in touch with your local borough officer who will support you throughout the accreditation process, help you create a School Travel Plan (STP) and select the most suitable activities for your school to address your travel issues and reach your active travel targets. A great resource to use during Road Safety Week.

Please let us know what you are doing for the week, you can share via our Twitter and Facebook pages, or using the hashtag #RoadSafetyWeek #SpeedDown

 

Managing a sudden death in the school community.

Child Bereavement UK are experts in supporting schools within the context of bereavement within a school community.  Through their work they have identified some of the key barriers for schools in responding appropriately and quickly to the needs of those affected by a bereavement. By working in partnership with LGfL, Managing a sudden death in the school community has been produced. This open access resource has been designed to bring the key information in both a video and text format with a quick and accessible interface.

Grief is a normal and natural response to loss, yet how pupils are supported can have significant impacts on long term outcomes. Young people tell us that how their school responds is something they never forget. This resource aims to provide an accessible support gateway to the effective response to death within school community. Simple, short guidance through quotes, external inks and video interviews with experts helps provide the information you need at the right time to ensure the whole school community can work together to support each other.

There are two ways in which this resource has been designed to be used.

  • General Staff CPD – Preparing in advance
    Raising awareness through staff CPD in advance of a predicted (or unpredicted) death within the school community ensures that when an event occurs staff know where to go immediately to receive appropriate guidance.
  • Use in a time of need
    The portal is designed to provide immediate support for schools that find themselves unexpectedly managing a sudden unpredicted death within their community. The resource is structured to make the guidance clear and accessible for fast assimilation of immediate actions for staff members.

The Support Gateway includes

  • The first 30 minutes
  • Breaking bad news
  • Supporting a bereaved family
  • Supporting the school staff
  • Traumatic deaths
  • Social media and media relations
  • Looking to the future

Video clips, information packs and external links are provided for staff to deliver comprehensive support.

‘This resource development has been an important piece of work to undertake in partnership with Child Bereavement UK. In times of need and extreme pressure following a sudden death within the community, we have utilised the power of online technology to provide invaluable and time critical guidance for different members of school communities. Sadly, recent events in London and Manchester, featured in the media highlight the impact of loss of life and the impact on local and school communities. In reality, many school communities are managing complex situations at short or no notice every day. We hope the format of the guidance through the use of short format video answers to key questions and relevant links and simple guidance can help manage the pressures for school leaders.’

 Bob Usher – LGfL Content Manager

‘From our experience of running a national helpline for over 15 years, Child Bereavement UK is acutely aware of the very real challenges schools experience when they are faced with the sudden, unexpected death of a pupil, a parent or a member of staff.  Many head teachers have shared with us that they feel ill-equipped to respond in the immediate aftermath of these sudden and often traumatic incidents; they are concerned to do their best, but are unsure as to how they should inform staff and pupils and what support to offer. 

Child Bereavement UK has therefore greatly valued the opportunity to work with London Grid for Learning, drawing on their experience in online technology, to create a resource that can enable schools to access information and guidance simply and quickly around the key considerations when responding to a death in the school community.   How schools manage these events is so important; bereaved children and young people tell us that the way their school responds at such a difficult time is something they never forget.’

Dr Ann Rowland – Director of Bereavement Support and Education

16th-22nd November is Children’s Grief Awareness Week UK, this  is designed to raise awareness of bereaved children and young people in the UK, and how providing those affected with free, professional support can make the world of difference to their future. More resources to support schools can be found on our blog.

 

 

 

 

How to be a champion of your subject and introduce LGfL content to your school.

Finding the time to get your subject a staff meeting can be near impossible when many staff meetings are set aside for School Priorities and Moderation. So how do you do it? How can you highlight and show your staff the key updates and content for your subject?

My idea is to use flexible CPD, don’t think about training as solid one hour blocks where all staff take part at the same time, think about your day and were you can pop in small bite sized training sessions that staff can access in easier less time-consuming sessions.

Over my years of teaching I have been a subject leader for various subjects and as a leader, my aim was always the same,  to help promote my subject and give teachers the key knowledge and skills to help push children forward. It can be hard to do at the best of times, but with many schools having less time and funds to let staff go off site and pay for CCPD, in-house staff training can be vital.

The idea of offering staff a different model of CPD was introduced to me by an amazing Apple Distinguished Educator named Aaron Webb, who at the time introduced the concept of ‘Techie Brekkie’ to my school.

Techie Brekkie has been around for many years and is a short (15mins) session which can be organised on a given morning every week to highlight a resource that can be used to enhance learning within the classroom, you didn’t need to go every week or even stay for the whole session, staff can dip in and out as they wish.

I adapted this idea and used it to highlight different resources within my school setting at the time, creating lots of easy to digest CPD sessions, such as “Google Docs and Danish” and “Clips and Cold Brew”, Giving staff a great start to the day by giving them much needed training and a snack!

Why not try this idea with LGfL content you know staff are interested in but lack training in? Perhaps “j2e and Juice” or “Widgit and waffles”.

 

Introduce the content by first going to the information page where you can get a short overview of the content and then model to your staff how to use the resource, remember to allow time for your staff to use the resource themselves and for them to enjoy their Brekkie!

I adapted this idea of flexible CPD to also help promote LGfL content within my school, as many staff within my own school lacked time to dive deep into the amazing content LGfL provides, I am very proud to announce that we are bringing this idea back in an ongoing way. introducing LGfL spotlight

LGfL Spotlight, will focus (or spotlight!) on one key curriculum resource per week, allowing you and your staff to see some amazing resources that you may not have seen before, where possible we will attempt to tie the content with relevant events happening in the Education calendar.

Every week we will adding posts to our social media channels (Follow us on twitter here and Facebook) highlighting one resource per week, the idea is to take this post and find a 5-minute moment during your school week where all staff are together, this could be a morning briefing or at the very beginning of a staff meeting, in this time you can introduce the content via LGfL’s very handy information pages, which offer key information about the resource as well as screen shots and videos to help. During the week, we will also offer more gems of information about our spotlighted resource.

LGfL Spotlight will be supported by the hashtag #LGfLspotlight, if you have organised a whole school session take a photo of it or if you have used the Spotlight resources in school that week we would love to see the results! Post them on twitter or Facebook with the hashtag #LGfLspotlight

 

 

 

Children in Need

LAST YEAR Children in Need raised an incredible £60 million and this year the organisers are aiming to raise even more money.

 

 

The evening of frolics and fundraising fun is fast approaching, but what’s planned for schools? Here’s how your school can get involved.

This year Children in need have created a range of new learning resources, including SEND lesson materials, to involve everyone in fundraising. All resources link to the curriculum and are packed with engaging new activities.

In addition, Children in Need have produced a NEW range of disability awareness lessons and resources. They’re designed to help pupils understand that difference shouldn’t be a barrier to friendship and think about what can be done to make schools inclusive environments for all.

 

One of the teaching opportunities mentioned by Children in Need uses the theme “Why Fundraise for BBC Children in Need?” were Students need to raise awareness of BBC Children in Need’s work among young people by creating a story board and Video, j2e offers a range of resources to help you create animations you could use JIT5 or j2spotlight to make you very own stop animation, which then can be embedded onto any website and if you need music for you videos then look no further then Audio Network, ask children to study other Charity videos and assess why particular types of music have been used and which piece of music would they pick to suit a particular scene and remember the easiest way to store and share you video is with  Video Central HD.

Another lesson “Moving pictures” explores the story of Logan, a child who has cerebral palsy. After listening to Logan’s story the challenge is for students to create a ‘mood board’ on a divided piece of paper to reflect Logan’s feelings before and after his therapy.

To inspire pupils, show them examples from Ben Uri: Portraits & Identity, this resource features a range of project ideas and visual art techniques for exploring the themes of Portraiture and identity.

Another lesson ‘in my shoes’ This lesson focuses on developing children’s empathy. They are encouraged to put themselves in other people’s shoes and think about what makes people happy. They watch a video about Alana, a seven-year-old girl with painful chronic eczema, and find out how she is being helped by a project funded by BBC Children in Need

If you would like to continue exploring this theme then you should explore Growing up around the World, the resources aim is to help UK children to understand the realities of childhood in very different contexts

The money donated is used to change the lives of disadvantaged children and young people in the UK. To date the charity event has raised more than £890 million to help make a difference in the lives of the children who needed it.

It’s not only the children and young people in Children in needs own projects that benefit from fundraising; your students gain so much too. From planning an event to counting up the money they’ve raised, students will be empowered, encouraged and motivated to work as a team.

This year’s Children in Need will be on November 17 at 7:30pm on BBC1.

Please let us know what you are doing for the week, you can share via our Twitter and Facebook pages, or using the hashtag #ChildrenInNeed

National Non Fiction November

National Non-Fiction November is the Federation of Children’s Book Groups’ annual celebration of all things factual. Born out of National Non-Fiction Day, the brain child of Adam Lancaster during his years as Chair, the whole month now celebrates all those readers that have a passion for information and facts and attempts to bring non fiction celebration in line with those of fiction.

The theme for this year is The World Around Us. Focusing on books that explore different natural environments and their flora and fauna. Through their engagement with books, the federation hope that young readers will:

  • be encouraged to look more closely at the world around them;
  • develop their natural curiosity and want to find out more for themselves;
  • expand their knowledge and build their expertise in topics of personal interest;
  • be inspired to take care of the natural world;
  • think about what action they could take to help protect endangered environments and species.

The Federation of Children’s Book Groups has produced a range of resources that teachers and children can use during the month. This includes a range of posters, bookmarks and suggested books for in the classroom. They have also produced a booklist of 100 brilliant non-fiction books for children and young people.

You can celebrate Non-Ficion November by joining us for our next Reading Zone Live with Oliver Jeffers.

We would love you to join in with this event and there are a number of ways you can do this:

  • If you have access to Video conferencing (VC) facilities you can link with the live event by emailing contentsupport@lgfl.net
  • If you do not have access to VC, you can e mail questions in advance to contentsupport@lgfl.net
  • You can watch the event live from 2:20 pm on the 15th November by clicking here. The linkwill enable to watch the live stream at 2:20pm on the day.
  • Tweet us before and during the event using the hashtag #RZL to @LGfL on Twitter or ourFacebook page.

Oliver has just published his first non-fiction book Here we are:

“It started off as a book about the realization that new life is a blank slate (trying to explain what a door is, and what a kitchen is for), and the strangeness of being a new parent. But as the book unfolded, so did the global events of the last year or so, and it felt like it became more urgent to reinforce some basic things my parents taught me about the simple principles of humanity. I wanted my son to know that while we are all unique individuals, we are all in this together.”

Listening Books available through LGfL have over100 curriculum based audiobook by simply logging on with their LGfL username and password. Two new releases to the LGfL Listening Book catalogue of audio books. “Why is Snot Green? And Other Extremely Important Questions” and “Inventors and their Bright Ideas” You can find out more about Listening Books in this blog post.

Other non-fiction resources available from LGfL include: Ebooks from Rising Stars, Talking stories and Inclusive resources.

Our history topics of The Romans in London, The Tudors in London, The Royal Mews and Polar Exploration all include lessons plans on the retrieval and recording of information from non-fiction sources.

Please let us know via our Twitter and Facebook pages or leave us a comment here to let us know what you are doing for Non Fiction November.

 

Using LGfL to develop IT skills across the Primary Curriculum

IT skills in the Primary Computing Curriculum are as follows:

EYFS: Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. Select and use technology for particular purposes. Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways , thinking about uses and purposes.

KS1 Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

KS2 Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.

Some of the skills that can be taught are listed in the image below.

LGfL have a wide range of resources to support the teaching of IT skills across the Primary curriculum. We have listed some below to help you with the teaching of IT within your schools.

EYFS

Busy Things have a range of games to develop keyboard skills. JIT is the online infant toolkit from Just 2 Easy and has a huge range of tools to support the development of IT skills including: word processing animation, paint and the ability to mix, to combine the above packages to create enabling pupils to select and choose the technology for different purposes. The big day out includes a range of activities that can be used – including researching transport in London past and present and taking a picture in London and labelling it. The Magic school was developed for Early years and includes paint, music and a sand and water room for the children to interact with.

KS1

JIT and Busy Things are both fantastic for developing IT skills at KS1 with the ability to create and manipulate a range of digital content.  There are lesson plans available for KS1 using J2Write for Years 1 and 2 that encourage creativity with writing and using the built in blogging tool to showcase and publish work. Busy things also have a range of templates to encourage writing, there are over 81 to choose from and cover topics across all curriculum areas.  Stop frame animator and Super Action Comic maker are two great tools for children to create digital content as is Picture Book maker.

KS2

J2e5 is a fantastic tool for the children to use that really meets the curriculum objectives for KS2,text, graphics, animations, sounds, videos, and embedded objects can be combined on a single web page. J2e forms can also be used as a way of creating questionnaires to gather data, comments, or other information from different groups. Data can then be displayed, shared, and saved to a file. Busy things also has templates that match the KS2 curriculum with both History and Science templates for the pupils to use.

The Romans in London, The Tudors in London and Polar exploration all support writing across the curriculum, with lesson plans and suggested activities for children to create their own digital content, including Gladiator Top Trumps, Tudor floor tiles and drawing up a list for a polar expedition. Reading Zone live and Grammar explained can be used in a variety of ways to support IT skills, the children could come up with their own questions they would like to ask their favourite author, use the information to create their own Author biographies and use Grammar explained to create their own short clips to explain grammatical concepts for their peers.

A basic knowledge of computers/tablets and or devices as listed below are skills that can be taught within the IT element.

Children’s Grief Awareness Week 16th – 22nd November 2017

Children’s Grief Awareness Week UK runs from 16th – 22nd November 2017 starting with Children’s Grief Awareness Day on the 16th November, a global day designed to help us all become more aware of the needs of grieving children — and of the benefits they obtain through the support of others.

1 in 29 school age children in the UK have been bereaved of a parent or a sibling. The week is designed to raise awareness of bereaved children and young people in the UK, and how providing those affected with free, professional support can make the world of difference to their future.

Children’s Grief Awareness Week UK 2017 will be an opportunity to acknowledge the painful impact that the death of a loved one has on the life of a child, and an opportunity to make sure these children receive the support they need. The theme for the week is #YoureNotAlone.

LGfL have partnered with Child Bereavement UK to produce a series of advice videos, guidance and links to support schools in managing a sudden death in the school community, these videos and resources are open access and are available to all schools, they also include sample Bereavement policies for school to use.

 

There are lots of resources to support schools in dealing with grief within the school community, we have listed them below and we hope that you find some of these helpful in supporting children, parents and staff in the event of a death.

Child Bereavement UK: The death of a pupil, a parent or a member of staff can have significant impact on the school community. Schools have a unique role in helping grieving children and young people. Child Bereavement UK supports families and educates professionals when a baby or child dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement, and has a wide range of information, resources and training for schools. They have also launched a video campaign #onemoreminute what would you say if you had one more minute:

Children’s Grief Awareness Day: Posters and fact sheets, suggestions for bulletin or newsletter announcements, and logos and other graphics are all available.

Childhood Bereavement Network: Has key messages for staff, parents and young people and ideas of how to support within school.

Cruse Bereavement Care: Cruse offers face-to-face, telephone, email and website support including information on: what you can do to help a child or young person who is grieving, how to understand the concept of loss in children and young people of different ages, how to recognise potential complicated grief. They have a Freephone national helpline and local services, and a website (hopeagain.org.uk) specifically for children and young people.

BBC: The BBC have a range of articles and videos that can be used within school, Talking about Bereavement details the work that Children in Need have supported.  Talking about death with your little one is an excellent video from Cbeebies that looks at the fact that when someone close to you dies, there will always be some difficult questions asked by your little ones regarding death. The video shoes how one parent has learnt to talk openly about why ‘Mummy’ died, in a way that makes sense to his two young children.

Winston’s Wish: Is the first charity that was set up to support bereaved children, their support for schools is extensive and includes a charter for bereaved children, an information pack and information on helping children create a memory box.

Please let us know what you are doing for the week, you can share via our Twitter and Facebook pages, using the hashtag #You’reNotAlone.

 

Bett Award finalists 2018

 

We are really pleased to announce that we have been shortlisted in not one but two categories for this years Bett awards. The prestigious awards, which are a key part of the educational technology year, are issued at a gala show during the annual Bett Show in January. Our first shortlisted finalist in the category classroom aids for learning, teaching and assessment is Cyberpass  a joint project between LGfL and Roar Educate.

 

Mark Bentley, LGfL DigiSafe Online Safety & Safeguarding Manager said “We are delighted that CyberPass has been shortlisted for a 2018 Bett Award. It is recognition of the continued relevance of CyberPass as a diagnostic tool to help schools maximise the limited time they have to address online-safety skills and identify strengths and weaknesses. We updated the quiz questions this summer to reflect new trends such as geotagging and live streaming and have also been using the data generated by CyberPass to share the lessons we can learn for the benefit of all teachers in a regular report.”

Our second shortlisted finalist in Primary Content is Sigurd and the Dragon VR – this immersive virtual reality app produced in association with Computeam takes children back in time to Viking Britain to hear the tale of Sigurd and the Dragon. Pupils embark on an impossible and unforgettable field trip to an authentic Viking Longhouse to hear the classic Norse tale of how Sigurd killed the greedy dragon Fafnir.

Bob Usher, LGfL Content Manager said “following on from our 2016 Bett Award for our Maya resource – A Journey through the Maya world, we are delighted that our ongoing partnership with Computeam has again resulted in Bett Award recognition for the innovative approach to supporting the primary curriculum. We have this time incorporated storytelling through both augmented and virtual reality, maximising each technology to deliver learning outcomes not possible through conventional means.”

This is backed up by five interactive worksheets that display augmented reality artefacts, exploring themes in Viking history from ‘Raiders and Traders’ to ‘Pagans’. The experience culminates in an activity covering green screen video and animation techniques, as the pupils tell their own tales from Norse Mythology.

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon VR app for iOS here or for Android here

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon AR app for iOS here or for Android here

You can view all shortlisted finalists here

 

Anti-Bullying week 13th – 17th November 2017

Anti-bullying week takes place from the 13th November to 17th November – the theme this year is ‘All Different, All Equal’ with the aims to:

  • empower children and young people to celebrate what makes them, and others, unique
  • help children and young people understand how important it is that every child feels valued and included in school, able to be themselves, without fear of bullying
  • encourage parents and carers to work with their school and talk to their children about bullying, difference and equality
  • enable teachers and other children’s workforce professionals to celebrate what makes us ‘all different, all equal’ and celebrate difference and equality.
  • Encouraging them to take individual and collective action to prevent bullying, creating safe environments where children can be themselves.

On Monday 13th November, the Anti-Bullying alliance is encouraging schools to have an odd socks day, an opportunity for children to express themselves and appreciate individuality.  They are also running a competition for schools, you can find out more here

In July 2017, the Department of Education updated their guidance on preventing and tackling bullying this advice can be found here.

Burger King recently launched the video below with an anti-bullying message that would be good to show in class and lead a discussion:

There are lots of resources to support this week within schools, we have selected a few below:

Anti-Bullying alliance has packs for both primary and secondary schools, these include lesson plans, assemblies and ideas for cross-curricular teaching.

Bullying UK has a range of resources, which include downloadable posters, flash cards, debate activity, comic strips and problem pages to use in the classroom. They also have presentations, interactive anti-bullying videos, posters and more.

Everyone Matters from LGfL has been produced to raise awareness of the problems of homophobic bullying in schools. Developed in partnership with the Metropolitan Police and Wandsworth and Waltham Forest local authorities, these resources feature role play scenarios to challenge both students and teachers to reflect on their own attitudes to this form of bullying.

Into film have a range of lessons plans and films that can be used in the classroom to discuss the theme of Bullying for both primary and secondary schools.

Unique Voice have lesson plans for KS1 and KS2 as well as draft policies for schools to use to adapt.

bullying.lgfl.net.  is a collation on LGfL of a range of resources to support schools including online bullying.

Please let us know what you are doing for the week, you can share via our Twitter and Facebook pages, using the hashtags #AntiBullyingWeek #AllDifferentAllEqual.