STEAM School & LGfL Pilot Project

Meet the people who are crafting our future…

LGfL and Steam School will be collaborating on a series of live broadcasts with leading tech entrepreneurs, giving LGfL members a unique, behind the scenes, insight into exciting industries like video gaming and why young people should develop their digital making and entrepreneurial skills whilst at school, preparing them for a very digital future.

At LGfL we are looking forward to a summer pilot project we are running with Steam School. The aim is to connect schools with science and tech innovators via weekly live broadcasts and accompanying mini challenges. By showcasing the stories of young innovators, discussing tech trends and scientific breakthroughs, Steam School inspires students to develop a new awareness about how rapid technological change is transforming the world in which we live.

Participating schools will be eligible to enter our Generation Tech Challenge with the possibility to win £250 for your school’s STEM budget. The broadcasts are scheduled to take place during the month of June 2019.

The dates for the live broadcasts at 2pm are:

  • 11th June – Starship Group
  • 18th June – Draw and Code
  • 26th June – Milky Tea
  • 3rd July – A Celebration Broadcast to announce the winners of the Generation Tech Challenges).

Please visit STEAM School Pilot to register your LGfL school’s interest in taking part.

In the meantime, if you are trying to promote STEM subjects in your school, here are some resources on LGfL to inspire teachers and pupils:

Polar Exploration

British Antarctic Expedition 1910-13

LGfL worked with the Scott Polar Research Institute at Cambridge University in creating this comprehensive resource, which provides a unique insight into the ‘Heroic Age of Scientific Discovery’. Featuring exclusive access to the historic archive of the most famous polar expeditions of the 20th Century, the resource includes:

  • Video footage of equipment and artefacts from the most famous expeditions, complete with text transcripts of the expert explanations
  • High-resolution photographs of objects featured in the video footage
  • Journal extracts read by a descendant of a member of Captain Scott’s Discovery expedition
  • Interactive map of the Polar Regions with plotted locations of the multimedia assets
  • The opportunity to meet a modern-day polar explorer and hear of his experiences living for extended periods of time in some of the world’s most extreme environments. A wide range of learning materials to support all images, video and audio recordings.

Space Adventures – Mission to the Moon

Follow the intrepid astronaut Tazz Anderson and her onboard computer (MIC) on a mission to the moon to bring back the valuable raw material ‘Dysprosium’ for use in smart devices back on planet Earth. Will she achieve the mission objectives and will she encounter any problems along the way?

It features dramatic content and a virtual reality experience linked to the narrative. The aim is to draw the learner into the turn of event that threats the ability of our intrepid astronaut Tazz to return safely back to Earth. Will her on board computer be enough to get her back safely or will she need to draw on her maths and science knowledge and understanding?

The resource features a comprehensive set of resources for maths, English and science and a computing unit created my Max Wainwright, author of the popular Espresso coding resource for primary schools.

There is even a section on how to build your own rocket and launch it with a Micro:bit as the integral data logger and how to create your own Space Adventures using green screen techniques. This resource could also be used if you are marking the Apollo 50th Anniversary in July. Watch this new video explaining how to run a live event and secure impact at school.

VR/AR Resources

LGfL works closely with the experts at Inspyro and Avantis to bring the latest Augmented and Virtual Reality content to LGfL schools. The aim is to help support the effective delivery of the curriculum through unique, engaging, interactive and affordable AR/VR experiences.

If you want a glimpse into the future of AR why not watch this explanation about how we can bring objects and people in to a classroom without even needing a trigger image:

Maths in the Real World

Maths in the Real World is a transition resource for Key Stage 2-3. The activities are ideal for use either before or after the move from primary to secondary. It offers detailed differentiation ensuring there is something for all ability levels and has been carefully designed in line with the national curriculum and natural mathematical learning.

There will be two additional units added later this term –

  • The Stock Market Challenge offers an exciting real world simulation of live stock market changes and how they can impact on the performance of shares and ultimately how much money can be won or lost.

  • The iPhone challenge explores how a deep understanding of probability could save you money when thinking of upgrading your phone.

Search and Rescue with HM Coastguard

Much more than a series of exciting, attention‐grabbing videos and images, Search & Rescue is extensively mapped to the maths national curriculum and includes detailed lesson plans and resources to enable pupils to apply their skills in context, solving problems for themselves. It features comprehensive and differentiated support materials; topics covered include Bearings, Pythagoras and Trigonometry, Algebra, Vectors and Speed, Distance and Time.

Viral Contagion Maths

Viral Contagion looks at the real world maths that could occur as a result of an outbreak of a biological virus in an urban area. Dramatised news reports describe the impact of the virus outbreak across South London, challenging students to consider the maths behind such scenarios.

This resource offers a collection of four discrete, differentiated lessons that provide an engaging and challenging focus for Key Stage 3 and 4 maths students.

Switched on Science

Switched on Science is a flexible and creative investigation-based programme with a clear focus on working scientifically in primary science lessons. It is packed with best-practice CPD videos and supportive lessons to ensure every teacher can deliver the programmes of study with confidence. The package comes with all the additional resources teachers need to teach the entire science curriculum, ranging from a video for each unit, teacher guide, interactive exercises, pupil workbooks, ideas for differentiation, and much more.

In addition to LGfL resources you may want to look here:

If you are interested in promoting the Arts in addition to STEM subjects too, read more about SteamCo’s work (they are another non-profit organisation). They are campaigning, celebrating and connecting pupils with the arts and their communities. One of the schools they have visited as part of their ArtsConnect19 tour is Parklands, Leeds. Many of you will have seen Chris Dyson, the Headteacher, deliver a keynote at our recent LGfL Curriculum Conference. Here is a video clip posted by Nick from SteamCo in case you missed Chris’ Keynote.

Also remember to visit EduBlocks; to make the transition from blocks to Python easier. Josh (15) is the creator of Edublocks and he was a huge hit at the recent LGfL Curriculum Conference when he delivered a keynote.

Finally, the BP Educational Service is a free, online STEM teaching resource that was established to inspire young people to pursue a future in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM). The BP Educational Service website provides an extensive range of free teaching resources to accompany the curriculum including videos, lesson plans, posters, quizzes and worksheets and the opportunity to take part in the annual Ultimate STEM challenge. If you would like to know more please visit https://bpes.bp.com/

Remember if you do use any LGfL content (especially relating to STEM) to inspire your students do let us know by posting them on LGfL’s Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

Explore Geography AR

Explore Geography AR aims to demonstrate Geographical concepts that are studied at KS2, KS3 and KS4 in a visual and interactive way making use of the latest technology.

The National Curriculum for Geography at all Key stages states that: A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives.  This statement is at the heart of this resource, Augmented Reality can help convey a complex concept like no other technology and Explore Geography does this with 9 different concepts.  We believe in blending technology seamlessly into the learning experience, ensuring that when technology is used in the classroom, it enhances pupils’ learning whilst still providing the engagement and wow factor.

The ‘Active worksheets’ have the AR triggers embedded so they can be printed out and distributed to students to support group or individual investigations. They cover a range of topics and concepts within both the KS2 and  KS3 curriculum and are perfect for using to cover specifications of the GCSE curriculum with students.

Spinning Planet looks at the Coriolis effect and is an interactive 3D model of the globe with students able to observe Hurricanes, Cyclones and Typhoons in action across the globe. With a Divided Planet , an interactive 3D model of the Earth enables pupils to examine lines of longitude and latitude alongside the tropics and Equator, these can be switched on and off and highlighted, something you are just not able to do on a physical globe or diagram.

Urbanisation triggers a mini app allowing pupils to control and view the effects of over time of urbanisation with a focus on key urban development variables and ‘tipping points’. Pupils can hypothesis about  urban growth and can develop a deeper understand of how the development of a sustainable urban environment has to be carefully balanced. Enabling group discussions around what happens to an area as it becomes urbanised? It also enables pupils to explore what kind of developments take place and how it affects the population, the environment, the economy and the social structure.  Our Changing climate tackles an incredibly complex subject matter of climate science through an interactive mini app that is triggered allows pupils to see the effects of climate change to this point and then model the possible outcomes on certain elements such as temperature and see level over time, something again that more traditional methods of teaching can not convey.

You can watch a walkthrough of the video below:

The Explore Geography resource features context based resources that are a blend of clear  and concise information and cutting edge Augmented Reality technology on the same page. A teacher guide is provided with instructions for activities the class can complete, or the resource can be used as a starting point with teachers developing their own lessons around them.  The free Geography ActivLens Augmented reality app for ioS and Android brings the information sheets to life with videos, audio, 3D models and animation.

 

 

The Romans – New AR and VR content.

The Romans in London resource has been a favourite amongst History teachers across the key stages for the last couple of years with over 200,000 page views since it was launched. This comprehensive resource has now  been updated with both AR (Augmented Reality) and VR (Virtual Reality) content.

Using incredible Augmented Reality, you can now see first hand examples of Roman life.  There are 10 trigger images in total that can be used alongside the Romans in London resource, they include working out calculations using Roman numerals, labelling a Roman Soldier, listening as Julius Ceasar takes us through important events as well as firing a first century Roman Balista.

You can see the AR in action in the videos below:

You can download the AR app for iOS devices here and for Android here

The VR element of the resource places the children on Hadrian’s Wall on a cold snowy night, using the app for either android or iOS devices and a compatible head set, the children can be transported back in time and are placed on top of the wall guarding the camp, to enjoy the full experience it is recommended that headphones are used.

The Romans in London resources are structured into the following sections:

  • The Roman invasion and the army
  • Boudica & the growth of Roman settlements in the London area
  • Everyday life
  • Baths & entertainment
  • Religion
  • Transport, trade & industry
  • Interactive Map of Roman find sites

The resource also features an interactive map of Roman London with Google Maps integration and Streetview showing the major Roman find sites. This simple tool allows any child in any location in London to explore the Roman Legacy wherever they live or go to school. 

High resolution images and High quality video resources including:

  • Gladiatorial battle re-enactments
  • The major Roman remains in the City of London
  • Replicas and real artefacts uncovered from archaeological discoveries in London
  • High resolution photographs courtesy of Museum of London Picture Library and Museum ofLondon Archaeology
  • Reconstructions of what Roman London might have looked like, maps and images of artefactscourtesy of Museum of London Picture Library

You can watch a summary walkthrough video below

and also the trailer can be found here:

The Museum of London also offer schools a range of workshops and sessions for schools that are studying the Romans over the next two terms, sessions include: Roman Amphitheatre, Hands on Romans and written in bone, you can find out more about the sessions here.

Sigurd and the Dragon VR

LGfL have once again teamed up with Computeam and Roger Lang FRSA, a long standing expert on this period of history to bring you an immersive mixed reality resource based on the tale of Sigurd and the Dragon.  Using Roger’s beautiful 3D photogrammetric scans of the cross we have brought this incredible object to life in amazing detail, allowing pupils to access its history and beauty, offering an innovative educational experience, that puts the pupils at the centre of history.

Sigurd and the Dragon takes the pupils back 1,000 years to the early Viking age in Britain. Using highly immersive virtual reality, they will embark on an impossible and unforgettable field trip to an authentic Viking Longhouse to hear the classic Norse tale of how Sigurd killed the greedy dragon Fafnir.The story is carved on a Christian cross in a churchyard in Halton Lancashire and pupils will also visit the cross viewing it as it remains today.

The virtual reality story telling is also backed up by 5 ActiveWorksheets that display Augmented Reality artefacts exploring themes in viking history from ‘Raiders and Traders’ to ‘Pagans’. The ActiveWorksheets can be given out to each pupil in your class or to a group of pupils, they are flexible and allow for both individual and group work exercises. This also gives flexibility in the number of devices you have available in your classroom.

The worksheets can deliver video, audio and 3D models & animations, you can tap into each individual’s preferred learning style using a single resource. This also helps EAL and/or SEN pupils who may struggle reading or listening to a resource.

Sigurd and the Dragon VR is a fantastic starting point for a whole range of activities. The ability to take pupils back in time and place is a very powerful experience. They emerge from it engaged and ready to learn. The final activity in the resource covers Green Screen and animation as the pupils tell their tales from Norse Mythology. Within this pack are backgrounds for Green Screen, original music by Roger Lang FRSA, Arthur Racham’s 1911 illustrations and sound effects.

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon VR app iOS here or for Android here

You can find the new Sigurd and the Dragon AR app for iOS here or for Android here

This resource can be used alongside Vikings at the British Museum, this striking resource began life as an educational film screened in cinemas around the UK. It not only includes original footage from the film, but also new, exclusive LGfL footage of curators handling Viking artefacts in the British Museum, plus high-resolution images of real-life Viking artefacts and a comprehensive glossary of Viking terms and words.

The resource is split into 8 modules; Archaeology, The Viking Ship, Raiders and Conquerors, TheVikings in Britain, Social Life, Looking Good, Trade and Industry, and Magic and Religion, allowing students to easily access specific topics and information.

Using the Gallery,from NEN children can also find high quality images that they are able to use in their own presentations about life in Viking times.

Tell us how you use VR in your class and share your work either on our Twitter or Facebook pages

Cold War VR Update

Einstein wisely stated, ‘The only source of knowledge is experience’.

As a teacher, we are always thinking on how can we deliver new experiences to students within the limitations of our school space and time, with many teachers finding it harder to go on school trips because of expense and time wasted travelling, we need to look at how technology can provide a range of immersive and engaging experiences that couldn’t normally happen within a normal school day.

The ClassVR by Avantis Whitepaper tells us that:

Virtual Reality, by its pure definition, can deliver experiences and interactions for students that are either not practical or not possible in the ‘real world’, provides an unparalleled way to immerse and captivate students of all ages. Virtual Reality helps students feel immersed in an experience, gripping their imagination and stimulating thought in ways not possible with traditional books, pictures or videos, and facilitates a far higher level of knowledge retention. “

With this in mind LGfL and the amazing team at Computeam have looked at updating our Cold war resource, so that it offers an experience that cannot be found anywhere else, that of a Virtual Reality Nuclear blast!

I spoke to Phil Birchinall Education Director at Computeam Ltd about this exciting update:

“Our challenge was to create a scenario that presented pupils with a realistic experience of the genuine level of fear that existed in the country during the late 70’s and in to the 80’s. Most people then considered it to be a matter of when not if, nuclear Armageddon and ‘mutually assured destruction’ would take place. We wanted to portray how life could change dramatically and instantly in the case of a nuclear strike. At the same time we don’t want to leave students traumatised! Our goal is to provide just enough jeopardy and threat to leave them feeling they have just experienced something significant.

 Also, this is a teaching resource so it has to be loaded with prompts and questions for further study and exploration. We made sure that the context is accurate. The sounds are all genuine sounds from the period, even the date it’s set, 18th July 1981. The bunker is an accurate recreation of a DIY bunker layout produced in the 1960”

 Finally, implementing VR into your curriculum fully can be hard and making sure it has an impact on learning as well as having the wow factor is vital. LGfL with help from ClassVR by Avantis have produced a prompt sheet which can help you on your class journey.

 

 

You can find the new Cold War Nuclear Strike app iOS here or for Android here

Tell us how you use VR in your class by sharing either on our Twitter or Facebook pages.

Augmented Reality updates

Apple have just released iOS 11 to the public, with so many exciting new features, one of the features you may have missed is the inclusion of ARkit a software development kit to enable the creation of new Augmented Reality Apps.

Bridging the gap between the virtual and physical worlds, Augmented reality (AR) is a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are “augmented” by computer-generated or extracted real-world sensory input, AR changes the way we see, imagine, and learn about the world around us.

AR in education allows students to interact with objects and concepts that they could never do without the aid of technology. Though it might be a buzz term in education circles, don’t assume that AR is just another fad. After all, profound learning occurs when students create, share, interact and explain by working with the environment around them.

LGfL have been at the forefront of using AR and have partnered with the AR experts at Computeam to create augmented reality apps for the Cold War (KeyStage 3/4), First

World War (Key Stage 2/3) and Maya and Prehistory (both Key Stage 2), and newly released this week Vikings (Key stage 2) Find out more at ar.lgfl.net

Here is what Phil Birchinall from Computeam  thinks about AR and the latest iOS11 update:

“We know that pupils react well to augmented and virtual reality stimuli. It creates a moment that they will remember. So, if that moment is structured within robust learning resources, that cognitive trigger and memory becomes associated with the subject or learning. We’ve learned a lot during our partnership with LGfL and have seen how pupils absorb and relate to this technology and how it can accelerate and deepen learning.

iOS 11 is a significant step forward. With ARkit we can now move away from trigger images (where appropriate). For example, in the LGfL WW1 resource, it’s possible to virtually drive a Mark 1 tank from 1916, but only triggered from an image (make sure you update your app!). With ARkit, that tank could be on any flat surface and could also be made to appear life size”

If you are still wondering ‘Why Augmented Reality?’ you may want to read this LGfL feature article on AR in teaching & learning.

 

How has AR in your classroom helped support learning?