World Space week – 4th October

World Space Week runs from the 4th – 10th October, and is an international celebration of all things Space and focuses on science and technology and its role in the past, present and future of mankind, a way of not only promoting the work that countries do together to explore space but also how important space technology is to life on earth.

The theme for the UN-declared World Space Week 2019 will be “The Moon:  Gateway to the Stars.”

There are a number of resources for educators to use during the week from the official World Space Week website.

If you haven’t used it yet, this week would be a perfect time to launch Space Adventures, this unique and engaging cross curricular resource is based around an original story commissioned by LGfL by the award-winning author Cath Howe, entitled Space Adventures: Mission to the Moon it fits in perfectly with the theme of the Space Week this year.

It features dramatic video content and a virtual reality experience linked to the narrative. The aim is to draw the learner into the turn of events that threatens the ability of our intrepid astronaut Tazz to return safely back to earth. Will her on board computer be enough to get her back safely or will she need to draw on her maths and science knowledge and understanding? You can watch a trailer below:

The resource features a comprehensive set of resources for Maths, Literacy and Science and a Computing unit created by Max Wainwright, author of the popular espresso coding resource for primary schools.

The video below shows how one school used Space Adventures and the impact that it had across the curriculum.

Space Adventures Live with CAS, BCS and LGfL for National EU Code week.

In association with CAS, BCS we are hosting a  live event on the 18th October for National EU Code Week, hosted via Hangouts/YouTube using Scratch classroom and the Space Adventures coding units, this will showcase LGfL resources, cloud based learning and outstanding computing pedagogy.

🚀Before the session: Children will need to have completed Units 1 & 2 of the LGfL Space Adventures unit of work and have stored their work on a Scratch Shared classroom (login & password will be shared with schools who sign up) which we will be able to access and view. For more information and to book:  https://community.computingatschool.org.uk/events/7239.

J2e have a range of tools that can be used within Space week, the children could use any of the tools in j2write, to complete research into the planets, space and the Solar System as well as creating fact files on famous astronauts. They could also use JIT to explore branching databases, sorting aliens.

J2code has a range of resources and examples that can be used.

JIT is a turtle based coding language in which you can code freely or use spite (Or more then one spite using advanced mode) and background templates to create simple short based animations for KS1.

Visual is a block based coding language in which you can freely code to create more complex coding outcomes for KS2, including for example, creating a space themed game:

Busy Things also have a range of labelling and fact sheet templates covering the Solar System and Space that can be used in class for KS1 and KS2, whilst younger children can get creative with designing their own spaceship. They have grouped activities in their special events section so that they can be easily pinned to be used during Space Week.

You can find lesson plans and activities from Switched on Science – The Out of this world Unit for Year 5 is perfect to use during World Space Week.

If you are running an event in school, you can register this on the World Space week website as well as finding a whole range of resources including: A Space nutrition activity sheet and an activity leaflet from Tim Peake.

Solar System Scope is a free online model of the Solar System and the Night Sky in real time with accurate positions of objects alongside a range of facts about the planets – great for research and showing in class, there is also a desktop version as well as both android and iOS apps.

2019 also marks the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings and there are a range of resources that you can use to celebrate the first steps on the moon.

BBC Teach have produced a collection of resources:

Highlights include:

  • An animated film for primary pupils about Neil Armstrong’s journey to the Moon
  • A collection of space-themed songs for Early Years and primary pupils
  • A guide exploring the secrets and stories behind the Apollo 11 mission
  • A mini-documentary about Neil Armstrong for secondary students, presented by Dermot O’Leary

NASA has also collated videos, pictures and audio on the Apollo 50th Website.  These would be great to use with students to look discuss how it must have felt to be part of that historic mission 50 years ago. Or why not use Significant People resource from LGfL which features Neil Armstrong, the active worksheet displays a 3D diorama of the Eagle lunar lander touching down on the Moon’s surface. The animation is accompanied by the original mission audio detailing the landing process.

Stem learning have a range of resources that can be used during Space Week, with just a few materials, building a paper model of the International Space Station (ISS) can become a class project. The resource contains a brief overview of the ISS, its parts, the science that occurs on board, instructions, and extension fact sheets. Learn about the ISS, explore fun facts, simulate building the station, and learn about the international partners.

Is there anyone out there? This resource was funded by the UK Space Agency and developed by ESERO-UK and CIEC Promoting Science. It is based upon the quest to discover more about the solar system through space projects such as the European Space Agency’s Aurora programme, and NASA’s Curiosity mission seeking to gather evidence of life on the planet Mars. The students take on the role of space scientists or space engineers to discover more about Mars. The activities in this resource are designed for students aged 9-12 years.The activities are organised into three themes: life, landscape and landing. Activities in the life and landscape themes are suitable for students aged 9 to 11.You can find all the resources here, including getting your students to train like an astronaut in P.E.

You class could even borrow the moon!

The STFC Lunar Rocks and Meteorites Loan Scheme has been running since the mid 1980s. It has lent the NASA Moon rock discs and meteorites to thousands of schools, museums and outreach organisers. You can find out how to apply here. The site also has a vast range of resources from the National Space centre suitable for ages 5-18.

There are great range of teaching resources on Moon Camp, Moon Camp features preparatory classroom activities that focus on learning-by-design and science experimentation. Here teachers will find inspirational resources to develop curricular scientific experiments related to the Moon. The classroom resources can be combined to develop interdisciplinary projects. The infographic below would be great to use to introduce the topic of the moon to children.

VirtualiTeach – a non profit site dedicated to all things AR and VR in Education have produced a great blog post entitled Space: The Virtual Frontier, it features a list of 20 experiences across four categories: AR apps, 360 videos on YouTube, mobile VR apps and full VR experiences from Steam.

Remember we would love to see your work for World Space week – you can share via our Twitter and Facebook page #WSW2019