The THIRD Live broadcast with STEAM School

Our third LIVE broadcast with STEAM School featured Milky Tea and aired on Tuesday 25th June at 2pm.

Creating a Video Game with Susie McBeth – hosted by Jade from STEAM School:

Milky Tea is a UK based Game Development and Animation Production Studio which was established in Liverpool in 2005. The studio designs, develops and publishes digital content for some of the globe’s biggest brands including NFL, Sony, Kraft, Bose and Toyota. The studio is renowned for its work in the UK on the Lloyds TSB ‘for the journey’ advertising campaign between 2007 – 2013 and is currently working on their latest game, HyperBrawl Tournament, currently in pre-beta and scheduled to be released on Steam and Nintendo Switch 2019.

The interview took place with Susie McBeth of Milky Tea with Jade Parkinson-Hill, the creator of STEAM Schools. She asked a number of questions including:

What skills and experiences did you have before you started your career in video games?

Tell us about your job in the video games sector?

Tell us about Milky Tea’s latest game – Hyperbrawl and what makes the and what makes the game so special?

How should young people prepare for careers in video games?

During the broadcast, @LGfL schools who were watching live, were encouraged to tag in @thesteamschool and use the hastag #generationtech to share their thoughts. During this live broadcast Cheam Common Junior, part of the LEO Academy Trust, asked a couple of questions via Twitter as shown in the screenshot below:

The winners of each of the Generation Tech Challenges will receive £250 prize money for their school’s STEM budget and we are looking forward to some of the entries being shared and the winners announced on our fourth and final broadcast.

We hope that all the pupils and schools who have taken part in the pilot study have enjoyed the experience and that the people who have been interviewed have opened their eyes to possible career paths they could follow using technology.

LGfL hosts a number of resources that pupils can experiment with from AR, VR and Mixed Reality resources, AppMaker to Busy Code (in Busy Things) and J2Code  in the J2Toolsuite to name just a few. Below is our ‘Explore Geography – Augmented Reality’ trailer.

‘KS1 – Significant People and Events – Augmented Reality’ trailer:

For more like this, visit the AR VR Channel on LGfL TV . It offers a unique insight into the latest developments in both Augmented and Virtual Reality from those leading the development within the schools sector.

If you have taken part in a Generation Tech Challenge or indeed have participated in the STEAM School pilot study, please do let us know by posting on LGfL’s Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

 

 

ReadingZone Live – Christopher Edge 12th June

Our next ReadingZone Live event features the author Christopher Edge on 12th June from 2:30pm.

Christopher Edge writes science-based fiction for 9/10+ readers and is an award-winning children’s author whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages.

Christopher grew up in Manchester where he spent most of his childhood in the local library dreaming up stories. As an adult, he still spends most of his time in the local library dreaming up stories but the libraries are now in Gloucestershire where he lives.

Before becoming a writer, he worked as an English teacher, editor and publisher – any job that let him keep a book close to hand. When not writing, he also works as a freelance publisher and education consultant and has written publications about encouraging children to read.

His novel The Many Worlds of Albie Bright won several children’s book awards and was also nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal, as was his novel The Jamie Drake Equation, which was also selected as one of the best new children’s books of 2017 for Independent Bookshop Week. His novel The Infinite Lives of Maisie Day has been shortlisted for the STEAM Children’s Book Prize and was also chosen by The Times as their Children’s Book of the Week.

You can find resources for his books, including book trailers, author videos, teaching notes, interviews, articles, reviews, sample chapters and even playlists for the book soundtrack by clicking here to be taken to his new resources page.

Below is the trailer for The Infinite Lives of Maisie Day:

ReadingZone Live brings regular interviews and live videos conferences with some of the best contemporary children’s authors and illustrators (Jaqueline Wilson, Michael Morpurgo, Lauren Child and Oliver Jeffers to name a few) to London schools through our partnership with ReadingZone.

LGfL schools are linked to our live author events via video conferencing, with one school selected to host the author event, during each event, authors discuss their writing process before answering the student’s questions via video. It is really easy to take part in one of our ReadingZone Live events and they can have a real impact on both the students and reading within your school. For more detailed guidance please read this updated information.

We want as many schools as possible to experience the ReadingZone Live programme in a live, interactive way.  You can also view the event on the day here: www.rzlwatch.lgfl.net starting at 2:30 pm on 12th June. More details of the event and how you can be involved can be found here. We also have a collaborative question document here where your students can pose their questions for Christopher.

This live event is most suitable for Upper Primary (Year 5 & 6) and possibly Year 7s too.

Remember if you do take part in the ReadingZone Live event, or use any LGfL content to inspire your students, do let us know by posting on LGfL’s Twitter or Facebook.

 

STEAM School & LGfL Pilot Project

Meet the people who are crafting our future…

LGfL and Steam School will be collaborating on a series of live broadcasts with leading tech entrepreneurs, giving LGfL members a unique, behind the scenes, insight into exciting industries like video gaming and why young people should develop their digital making and entrepreneurial skills whilst at school, preparing them for a very digital future.

At LGfL we are looking forward to a summer pilot project we are running with Steam School. The aim is to connect schools with science and tech innovators via weekly live broadcasts and accompanying mini challenges. By showcasing the stories of young innovators, discussing tech trends and scientific breakthroughs, Steam School inspires students to develop a new awareness about how rapid technological change is transforming the world in which we live.

Participating schools will be eligible to enter our Generation Tech Challenge with the possibility to win £250 for your school’s STEM budget. The broadcasts are scheduled to take place during the month of June 2019.

The dates for the live broadcasts at 2pm are:

  • 11th June – Starship Group
  • 18th June – Draw and Code
  • 26th June – Milky Tea
  • 3rd July – A Celebration Broadcast to announce the winners of the Generation Tech Challenges).

Please visit STEAM School Pilot to register your LGfL school’s interest in taking part.

In the meantime, if you are trying to promote STEM subjects in your school, here are some resources on LGfL to inspire teachers and pupils:

Polar Exploration

British Antarctic Expedition 1910-13

LGfL worked with the Scott Polar Research Institute at Cambridge University in creating this comprehensive resource, which provides a unique insight into the ‘Heroic Age of Scientific Discovery’. Featuring exclusive access to the historic archive of the most famous polar expeditions of the 20th Century, the resource includes:

  • Video footage of equipment and artefacts from the most famous expeditions, complete with text transcripts of the expert explanations
  • High-resolution photographs of objects featured in the video footage
  • Journal extracts read by a descendant of a member of Captain Scott’s Discovery expedition
  • Interactive map of the Polar Regions with plotted locations of the multimedia assets
  • The opportunity to meet a modern-day polar explorer and hear of his experiences living for extended periods of time in some of the world’s most extreme environments. A wide range of learning materials to support all images, video and audio recordings.

Space Adventures – Mission to the Moon

Follow the intrepid astronaut Tazz Anderson and her onboard computer (MIC) on a mission to the moon to bring back the valuable raw material ‘Dysprosium’ for use in smart devices back on planet Earth. Will she achieve the mission objectives and will she encounter any problems along the way?

It features dramatic content and a virtual reality experience linked to the narrative. The aim is to draw the learner into the turn of event that threats the ability of our intrepid astronaut Tazz to return safely back to Earth. Will her on board computer be enough to get her back safely or will she need to draw on her maths and science knowledge and understanding?

The resource features a comprehensive set of resources for maths, English and science and a computing unit created my Max Wainwright, author of the popular Espresso coding resource for primary schools.

There is even a section on how to build your own rocket and launch it with a Micro:bit as the integral data logger and how to create your own Space Adventures using green screen techniques. This resource could also be used if you are marking the Apollo 50th Anniversary in July. Watch this new video explaining how to run a live event and secure impact at school.

VR/AR Resources

LGfL works closely with the experts at Inspyro and Avantis to bring the latest Augmented and Virtual Reality content to LGfL schools. The aim is to help support the effective delivery of the curriculum through unique, engaging, interactive and affordable AR/VR experiences.

If you want a glimpse into the future of AR why not watch this explanation about how we can bring objects and people in to a classroom without even needing a trigger image:

Maths in the Real World

Maths in the Real World is a transition resource for Key Stage 2-3. The activities are ideal for use either before or after the move from primary to secondary. It offers detailed differentiation ensuring there is something for all ability levels and has been carefully designed in line with the national curriculum and natural mathematical learning.

There will be two additional units added later this term –

  • The Stock Market Challenge offers an exciting real world simulation of live stock market changes and how they can impact on the performance of shares and ultimately how much money can be won or lost.

  • The iPhone challenge explores how a deep understanding of probability could save you money when thinking of upgrading your phone.

Search and Rescue with HM Coastguard

Much more than a series of exciting, attention‐grabbing videos and images, Search & Rescue is extensively mapped to the maths national curriculum and includes detailed lesson plans and resources to enable pupils to apply their skills in context, solving problems for themselves. It features comprehensive and differentiated support materials; topics covered include Bearings, Pythagoras and Trigonometry, Algebra, Vectors and Speed, Distance and Time.

Viral Contagion Maths

Viral Contagion looks at the real world maths that could occur as a result of an outbreak of a biological virus in an urban area. Dramatised news reports describe the impact of the virus outbreak across South London, challenging students to consider the maths behind such scenarios.

This resource offers a collection of four discrete, differentiated lessons that provide an engaging and challenging focus for Key Stage 3 and 4 maths students.

Switched on Science

Switched on Science is a flexible and creative investigation-based programme with a clear focus on working scientifically in primary science lessons. It is packed with best-practice CPD videos and supportive lessons to ensure every teacher can deliver the programmes of study with confidence. The package comes with all the additional resources teachers need to teach the entire science curriculum, ranging from a video for each unit, teacher guide, interactive exercises, pupil workbooks, ideas for differentiation, and much more.

In addition to LGfL resources you may want to look here:

If you are interested in promoting the Arts in addition to STEM subjects too, read more about SteamCo’s work (they are another non-profit organisation). They are campaigning, celebrating and connecting pupils with the arts and their communities. One of the schools they have visited as part of their ArtsConnect19 tour is Parklands, Leeds. Many of you will have seen Chris Dyson, the Headteacher, deliver a keynote at our recent LGfL Curriculum Conference. Here is a video clip posted by Nick from SteamCo in case you missed Chris’ Keynote.

Also remember to visit EduBlocks; to make the transition from blocks to Python easier. Josh (15) is the creator of Edublocks and he was a huge hit at the recent LGfL Curriculum Conference when he delivered a keynote.

Finally, the BP Educational Service is a free, online STEM teaching resource that was established to inspire young people to pursue a future in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM). The BP Educational Service website provides an extensive range of free teaching resources to accompany the curriculum including videos, lesson plans, posters, quizzes and worksheets and the opportunity to take part in the annual Ultimate STEM challenge. If you would like to know more please visit https://bpes.bp.com/

Remember if you do use any LGfL content (especially relating to STEM) to inspire your students do let us know by posting them on LGfL’s Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

World Space Week – October 4 – 10 2018

World Space week runs from the 4th – 10th October, and is an international celebration of all things Space and focuses on science and technology and its role in the past, present and future of mankind, a way of not only promoting the work that countries do together to explore space but also how important space technology is to life on earth.

The theme for UN-declared World Space Week 2018 will be “Space Unites the World,” and “will celebrate the role of space in bringing the world closer together,” said WSWA President Dennis Stone.

There are a number of resources for educators to use during the week from the official World Space Week website.

If you haven’t used it yet, this week would be a perfect time to launch Space Adventures, this unique and engaging cross curricular resource is based around an original story commissioned by LGfL by the award-winning author Cath Howe.

It features dramatic video content and a virtual reality experience linked to the narrative. The aim is to draw the learner into the turn of events that threatens the ability of our intrepid astronaut Tazz to return safely back to earth. Will her on board computer be enough to get her back safely or will she need to draw on her maths and science knowledge and understanding? You can watch a trailer below:

The resource features a comprehensive set of resources for Maths, Literacy and Science and a Computing unit created by Max Wainwright, author of the popular espresso coding resource for primary schools.

J2e have a range of tools that can be used within Space week, the children could use any of the tools in j2write, to complete research into the planets, space and the Solar System as well as creating fact files on famous astronauts. They could also use JIT to explore branching databases, sorting aliens.

J2code has a range of resources and examples that can be used.

JIT is a turtle based coding language in which you can code freely or use spite (Or more then one spite using advanced mode) and background templates to create simple short based animations for KS1.

Visual is a block based coding language in which you can freely code to create more complex coding outcomes for KS2, including for example,  creating a space themed game:

Busy Things also have a range of labelling and fact sheet templates covering the Solar System and Space that can be used in class for KS1 and KS2, whilst younger children can get creative with designing their own spaceship.

You can find lesson plans and activities from Switched on Science – The Out of this world Unit for Year 5 is perfect to use during World Space Week.

If you are running an event in school, you can register this on the World Space week website as well as finding a whole range of resources including: A Space nutrition activity sheet and an activity leaflet from Tim Peake.

This picture which was first posted on Twitter shows all the planets in on picture – Pluto is included and the picture is not to scale, however I think it would make an excellent introduction to the topic of Space as well as being great on display – you can see the original painting here.

Stem learning have a range of resources that can be used during Space Week, with just a few materials, building a paper model of the International Space Station (ISS) can become a class project. The resource contains a brief overview of the ISS, its parts, the science that occurs on board, instructions, and extension fact sheets. Learn about the ISS, explore fun facts, simulate building the station, and learn about the international partners.

Is there anyone out there? This resource was funded by the UK Space Agency and developed by ESERO-UK and CIEC Promoting Science. It is based upon the quest to discover more about the solar system through space projects such as the European Space Agency’s Aurora programme, and NASA’s Curiosity mission seeking to gather evidence of life on the planet Mars. The students take on the role of space scientists or space engineers to discover more about Mars. The activities in this resource are designed for students aged 9-12 years.The activities are organised into three themes: life, landscape and landing. Activities in the life and landscape themes are suitable for students aged 9 to 11.

You can find all the resources here, including getting your students to train like an astronaut in P.E.

Your class could even borrow the moon!

The STFC Lunar Rocks and Meteorites Loan Scheme has been running since the mid 1980s. It has lent the NASA Moon rock discs and meteorites to thousands of schools, museums and outreach organisers. You can find out how to apply here. The site also has a vast range of resources from the National Space centre suitable for ages 5-18.

The Moon Camp Challenge is a new interdisciplinary school project that invites students, aged 8 to 19, to team up and design their own human base on the Moon, a ‘Moon Camp’. The project will allow students to use exciting and innovative learning technologies, such as 3D modelling, to explore the extreme environment of space, in particular on the Moon, to better understand how environment affects habitability.

The first Moon Camp Challenge will run in the school year 2018/19. It will be launched during World Space Week 2018 and it will continue throughout 2019, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landing.  In the future, to enable astronauts to stay on the Moon for long periods of time, new infrastructures have to be developed to solve important challenges; protection from radiation and meteorites, energy production, the extraction and recycling of water, food production and much more. The Moon Camp Challenge invites students to become Moon explorers and decode some of the complexities future astronauts may face.

The Moon Camp Challenge is an educational and inspirational programme run in collaboration between ESA and the Airbus Foundation, featuring preparatory classroom activities that focus on learning-by-design and science experimentation. Students will have to develop a number of scientific experiments related to the Moon and apply their acquired knowledge to design their own Moon Camp using a 3D modelling tool (Tinkercad or Fusion 360).

The participating teachers and students will be invited to participate in webinars with space experts and then share their designs online. A jury of experts will select the best projects.

Participation is open to teams of students aged 8-19 through two entry paths: ESA Member States or Associate Member States, and worldwide. Teams will also be able to choose between two different difficulty levels. Teams must be supported by a teacher or an educator.

The BBC have a great range of clips around Space, including this collection from CBeebies great for using with younger students and includes Dr Brian Cox reading The way back home by Oliver Jeffers.

VirtualiTeach – a non profit site dedicated to all things AR and VR in Education have produced a great blog post entitled Space: The Virtual Frontier, it features a list of 20 experiences across four categories: AR apps, 360 videos on YouTube, mobile VR apps and full VR experiences from Steam.

Discovery Education Espresso is giving primary schools access to fantastic free resources, helping teachers to bring the wonders of space into the classroom. Taking children on a fascinating tour across the universe, the resources include interactive videos, lesson plans and activities, closely mapped to the National Curriculum. From visiting observatories to looking deep into our solar system, to tracking cosmic firestorms, meteors and shooting stars, these exciting free resources will engage younger children with space science. They’ll also help pupils to see the bigger picture, as they learn about the future of space travel and life on other planets. With spectacular clips from television network Discovery Science, and contributions from world famous astronomer Professor Richard Ellis, children will learn about space in a fun and accessible way.

The resources also include a special World Space Week lesson plan: Beyond Planet Earth – A Virtual Space Experience, culminating in an out-of-this-world virtual reality tour of the universe.

Remember we would love to see your work for World Space week – you can share via our Twitter and Facebook page #WSW2018